Tender Moments – before the sunset

© Photo: Riihele. All rights reserved.

I do not wish to think of snow, that we have by the bucket load!
I do not wish to think of cold, it is only freeezing!
I do not wish to think of winter …

So hence, this

TENDER MOMENTS – before the sunset –
taken in Jerusalem a couple summers ago.

Do you feel the warmth and glorious glow of the hot day that was?

Aaah… those were them days, i say.

P.S.
The photo is totally untouched even though it looks like watercolour painting.

Picture Perfect: CURVES

My curves are not crazy. Henri Matisse(1869-1954)

Peeking inside The Modern Cardo
© Photo: Riihele. All rights reserved.

Everything is beautiful, all that matters is to be able to interpret. Camille Pissarro (1830-1903)

Art is a harmony parallel with nature. Paul Cezanne (1839-1906)

This is my entry on the Picture Perfect CURVES.
Take ye great care. Rii 🙂


This is the side entrance into the modern part of the Cardo which is covered and full of the most fancy shops. My favourite place for shopping in Jerusalem, actually. It is the modernized part of the Cardo and a very nice place to shop indeed.

HOLOCAUST Memorial Day 27.1.


The photo is part of The Names at the Yad Vashem* Museum in Jerusalem by me.

January 27, aka today is the annual official day for the remembrance of the victims of the Nazi-era worldwide and here is the what the UN has decreed on the same:

“International Holocaust Remembrance Day (January 27) is an annual international day of remembrance designated by an official resolution of the United Nations General Assembly on November 1, 2005.

The resolution urges every member nation to honor the memory of Holocaust victims and encourages the development of educational programs about Holocaust history as part of the resolve to help prevent future acts of genocide.

“There can be no reversing the unique tragedy of the Holocaust. It must be remembered, with shame and horror, for as long as human memory continues. Only by remembering can we pay fitting tribute to the victims. Millions of innocent Jews and members of other minorities were murdered in the most barbarous ways imaginable. We must never forget those men, women and children, or their agony.” — United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, January 27, 2006. (Wikipedia)

I was wondering as to ’why’ this day of January 27, until I realized that this is the day that the Soviets entered/liberated the Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camps in 1945 where some 1,1 to 1,6 million people perished; 90 per cent of them Jews. My dad visited these camps about five to ten years later after the events and his comments were ‘that it still did smell very nauseatingly of burned flesh’ – amazing when one thinks of the time-lapse. He also had black and white photographs of the ovens, the barracks, the imposing entrance at Birkenau and generally of the camps. I did find these pictures very haunting to look at, by the way.

A further quote off Wikipedia:

“…about three-quarters of the total, went to the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau within a few hours; they included all children, all women with children, all the elderly, and all those who appeared on brief and superficial inspection by an SS doctor not to be fully fit.In the Auschwitz Birkenau camp more than 20,000 people could be gassed and cremated each day. At Birkenau, the Nazis used a cyanide gas produced from Zyklon B pellets, which were manufactured by two companies who had acquired licensing rights to the patent held by IG Farben….
At the Auschwitz complex 405,000 prisoners were recorded as slaves between 1940 and 1945. Of these about 340,000 perished through executions, beatings, starvation, and sickness. Some prisoners survived through the help of German industrialist Oskar Schindler, who saved about 1,100 Polish Jews by diverting them from Auschwitz to work for him, first in his factory near Kraków and later at a factory in what is now the Czech Republic.”

In my entry on Amsterdam some time back, I mentioned that I visited the Anne Frank House Museum and this is what I said then: ”The horror of the Nazi era came alive in the Anne Frank House where we spent hours looking, thinking and going from room to room in the Annex as it still looks like it was when the people and Anne herself were hiding in there. The bookshelf – so familiar from the book of Anne’s, ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ – is still there…”

In Israel, the day for the Holocaust Remembrance, Yom HaShoah, is in the spring which I have witnessed there myself for a few times; the Wikipedia puts it like this:

“On the eve of Yom HaShoah in Israel, there is a state ceremony at Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes Authority. At 10:00am on Yom HaShoah, throughout Israel, air-raid sirens are sounded for two minutes. Public transport (including virtually all highway vehicles) comes to a standstill for this period, and people stop and stand silent. During Yom HaShoah, public entertainment and many public establishments in Israel are closed by law. Israeli television and radio channels broadcast mourning songs and documentaries about the Holocaust, without commercials. All flags on public buildings are flown at half mast.

Also during this day, tens of thousands of Israeli high-school students, and thousands of Jews from around the world, hold a memorial service in Auschwitz, in what became known as “The March of the Living“, in defiance of the Holocaust Death Marches.”

Additional information: Oliver Lustig’s Presentation of Historic Holocaust Photograps @ I Survived.org/ Holocaust Remembrance Network.

Tis for now. Riihele xx

Holocaust; the literal meaning of the word is: Completely burnt.
The Holocaust
(from the Greek ὁλόκαυστον (holókauston): holos, “completely” and kaustos, “burnt”).

* YAD VASHEM: The origin of the name is from a Biblical verse:

“And to them will I give in my house and within my walls a memorial and a name … that shall not be cut off.” (Isaiah, chapter 56, verse 5) In Hebrew, “a memorial and a name” translates as yad va-shem. A literal translation would be “hand and name.” (Wikipedia)

(Re-entry.)

PICTURE PERFECT: ANTICIPATION

The act of anticipating, taking up, placing,
or considering something beforehand,
or before the proper time in natural order.

”But if we learn to think of it as anticipation, as learning, as growing,
if we think of the time we spend waiting for
the big things of life as an opportunity
instead of a passing of time,
what wonderful horizons open out! ”

Anna Neagle

In Anticipation of a good meal!

Do you notice the ANTICIPATION with the knife and the fork all poised to tackle this delicous meal because paparazzi Da Blonde yelled:

“Wait, wait I want to take a photo!”

In Anticipation of a good meal!

 

 

 

The restaurant we had this fabulous meal* is this:”Located off the courtyard of Yemin Moshe’s Confederation House, Te`enim**
is a charming, quiet corner in one of Jerusalem’s classic neighborhoods.
Oversized windows provide exquisite views of the Old City,
and the inner courtyard is decorated with Armenian-tiled tables and stone benches
— perfect for parties and family celebrations. The restaurant offers a unique vegetarian menu,
including seaweed soup, tofu skewers and more.

Local tip:
Save time to wander through the alleyways of Yemin Moshe.
It’s one of the capital’s most picturesque, and historic, neighborhoods.”
Go Jerusalem online

Yemin Moshe
is a picturesque, beautifully restored neighbourhood
– an architectural treasure
and one of the most elegant addresses in Jerusalem.
There are no shops, but the views are spectacular.
It’s a fascinating place for an early evening or winter afternoon stroll.”

Source: Frommers.com

This is my entry on the theme

“ANTICIPATION”

on

PICTURE PERFECT.^^

Tis for now, Rii xx

© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.

*The black shrivelled tingies are Char-grilled Aubergines!!
Delicious it was apparently. Mine was a different very delish vegetarian dish as well.
** Te’enim means’Figs’ in Hebrew.

^^ Picture Perfect works so that we are given the ‘title’ in a word and we have to match that with a photo.

Flower Power: ROSES ARE WHITE…

Lovely Setting of Roses

Roses are White...

White Roses

White Roses bathing in Sunshine

Do let your sight & soul rest on these pure beauties…

Tis light,
bright,
white
entry
for now
from Rii xx

© Photos by Riihele. All rights reserved

Common Name: Floribunda rose
Genus: Rosa
Cultivar: ‘Iceberg’
Skill Level: Beginner
Exposure: Full sun
Hardiness: Hardy
Soil type: Well-drained/light, Clay/heavy, Moist
Height: 80cm
Spread: 65cm
Flowering period: July to October
Iceberg should be pruned from late winter to early spring.
Introduced: in 1958

Source for the above iNFO: BBC Gardening

Moment in Time: WINDOWS 2 NOWHERE

Two-Tier Windows to Nowhere

Ruins galore in the Old City of Jerusalem at the Jewish Quarter.
The quarter has had a rich history,
with a nearly continual Jewish presence
since the eight century B.C.E.

Two-Tier Windows to Nowhere

Tis for now. Riihele xx 

© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.

Come with me to: CARDO

MADABA MAP

The top picture to this entry is an ancient map of Jerusalem,
Madaba Map found in 1897 in Jordan.

A few weeks ago I did the Come with me to: Yemin Moshe and today tour is to Cardo in the Old City of Jerusalem. Hold on to your water bottles and let’s do some more stepping on these zillions of stairs that there are in this city!

Historical Part of the Cardo

In ancient Roman city planning, a CARDO or cardus was a north-south-oriented street in cities, military camps, and coloniae. Sometimes called the Cardus Maximus, the cardo served as the center of economic life. The street was lined with shops, merchants, and vendors. The Cardo in the Old City of Jerusalem is one good example. After the Jewish rebellion of 70 was crushed by Titus’ troops, Jerusalem was refounded as Colonia Aelia Capitolina and its new city plan featured a long colonnaded cardo running from north to south, date from the time of Emperor Justinian in the 6th century. The cardo is still a street in modern Jerusalem.

Steps down to the Historical Cardo

Most Roman cities also had a Decumanus Maximus, an east-west street that served as a secondary main street. Due to varying geography, in some cities the decumanus is the main street and the cardo is secondary, but in general the cardus maximus served as the primary road. The Forum was normally located at the intersection of the Decumanus and the Cardo.

Row of Ancient Pillars & Stalls

Aelia Capitolina (Latin in full: Colonia Aelia Capitolina) was a city built by the emperor Hadrian in the year 131, and occupied by a Roman colony, on the site of Jerusalem, which was in ruins when he visited his dominion known as Syria Palæstina.Aelia” came from Hadrian’s nomen gentile, Aelius, while “Capitolina” meant that the new city was dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus, to whom a temple was built on the site of the Jewish temple. A Roman colonia (plural coloniae) was originally a Roman outpost established in conquered territory to secure it. Eventually, however, the term came to denote the highest status of Roman city,

Cardo Pillars of olden times

The establishment of Aelia Capitolina resulted in the failed Bar Kokhba’s revolt of 132-135. Jews were forbidden to live in the city. Roman enforcement of this prohibition continued through the fourth century. The city was without walls, protected by a light garrison of the Tenth Legion, during the Late Roman Period. The detachment at Jerusalem, which apparently encamped all over the city’s western hill, was responsible for preventing Jews from returning to the city.

The urban plan of Aelia Capitolina was that of a typical Roman town wherein main thoroughfares crisscrossed the urban grid lengthwise and widthwise. The original thoroughfare, flanked by rows of columns and shops, was about 73 feet (22 meters) wide (roughly the equivalent of a present-day six lane highway). The Hadrianic Cardo Maximus of Aelia terminated somewhere in the area of the present David Street

Ancient Stall units

Wonder what was for sale in this stall?! Maybe spices… What do you think?

Close-up of the Top of the Pillar

The style of the column is the Corinthian which was developed in the Greek city of Corinth. It was much used by the Romans for its showiness. The Corinthian style is an imitation of ’the slenderness of a maiden.” (According to the Roman author Vitruvius)

Row of Pillars

Mighty row of columns, I say!

This photograph is looking back at the Menora and the ancient covered part of the Cardo which is left as it was found, more or less.

Peeking inside The Modern Cardo

This is the side entrance into the modern part of the Cardo
which is covered over, and it is full of the most fancy shops.
My favourite place for shopping in Jerusalem, actually.

YOU MADE IT!
Great. So very lovely to have
Your company on this tour.

Tis for now Rii xx

PS Most of the iNFO: Wikipedia
© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.
Top picture: Wikipedia