PICTURE PERFECT: WATER

“Water, water, everywhere, nor any drop to drink…”

It’s from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge – when the Ancient Mariner is stuck in the middle of the sea.

Planet Earth has a total surface area of close to 197 million square miles. Most of this surface is covered by water. Most of this water is salty or in the form of ice and thus is not directly usable by humans. About 97% of the total water on earth is in the oceans or salt lakes. Another 2% of the total amount is locked up in the form of ice; so that is to say that we humans only have ONE per cent of the water to use and re-use over and over again!! And, of this 1%, agriculture takes seventy per cent; thus leaving for the population on the globe just 30 per cent (of that one per cent) of the water to ‘indulge’ in!

It is estimated that at any given time only about 1/3 of 1% of the total water on earth can be used by humans for agriculture or human consumption!! (pages.prodigy.net/jhonig..)

Southern end of Lake Kinneret
© All photos  Riihele. All rights reserved

This photo is part of a set pics that I took  in Israel in November 2002 at the Lake Kinneret* or as it is known as well, Sea of Galilee. The town of Tiberias is on the right of the photo and the Golan Heights on the left. These boats that we had the ‘rides’ are based on an ancient model found by the lake shore some years ago.

Did you know that more than five million people die from waterborne diseases each year – 10 times the number killed in wars around the globe. (BBC online on article, Water scarcity: A looming crisis?) Here is a Quiz: World Water crisis. Go on, have a go and see how you will do on it. Intriguing information methinks. ‘

Another rather amusing article I read in a newspaper about a scientifically made testing about some of the bottled waters on the market versus the tap water in Helsinki. Guess which one came on top as the best? Tap water in Helsinki, believe it or not! (Certainly tis true that the water on tap here in Finland is both very tasty and very clean – so far, so good, that is.)

This is my contribution on the PICTURE PERFECT theme  WATER.

 Have a grand weekend and do keep so well. Rii

*
The name may originate from the Hebrew word kinnor (“harp” or “lyre”) in view of the shape of the lake.

This is a video of a bunch of kids dancing the Israeli folk dance called ‘Mayim, Mayim‘ aka ‘Water, Water’. I dance it meself as well, by the way.

One Afternoon by a Lake…

October is the month of moody clouds,
low sunlight, and
the last colourful autumnal leaves,
barely visible on the trees.

Wonderful light on the scenery

Lakeside with boats

Beautifully shaped Tree

Tree with the large boats

Bridge in Sunlight

Tis for now, Rii xx

© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.

The OASIS of EIN BOKEK

The Dead Sea has a climate which boasts year-round sunny skies and dry air with low pollution. It has less than 50mm mean annual rainfall and a summer average temperature between 32 and 39 degrees Celsius.The winter average temperature is between 20 and 23 degrees Celsius. The region has weakened UV radiation, particularly the UVB (erythrogenic rays), and an atmosphere characterized by a high oxygen content due to the high barometric pressure. The shore is the lowest dry place in the world. (Wikipedia)Photo:
Mountain, Palms & Hotel in Ein Bokek
The Dead Sea measures 67 km (42 miles) long, 18 km (11 miles) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley. The main tributary is the Jordan River.The Dead Sea has attracted interest and visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. It was a place of refuge for King David, one of the world’s first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of products as diverse as balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers.Photo: Ein Gedi
”Although the medicinal indications of the water have not yet been adequately researched, this therapeutic resource is a great attraction, which gives the area advantages over other such places in Israel and the world. In addition to the medical properties of the water, the climate and atmosphere of the region have a therapeutic value of their own.The high atmospheric pressure, the highest in fact on earth, results in the highest oxygen content on earth and low ultra-violet radiation. This permits prolonged sun bathing without danger of burning on almost every day of the year.The absence of polluting contaminants makes for pure air, which eases bronchitis and bronchial conditions. On the other hand, the combination of low humidity and high evaporation contributes to accelerating the body’s metabolic processes. These climatic properties have a considerable effect on the non-specific treatment of certain diseases based on stimulation of cells and tissues while acting against unhealthy internal and external stimuli.” WikipediaPhoto: The Swimming Pool
King David, King Herod, Jesus, and John the Baptist stayed in the Dead Sea area. The prophets knew it via the infamous Sodom and Gomorra.During the Egyptian era it is said that Queen Cleopatra obtained exclusive rights to build cosmetic and pharmaceutical the area. Later on, the wily Nabateans discovered the value of bitumen extracted from the Dead Sea and needed by the Egyptians for embalming their mummies. Aristotle wrote about the remarkable waters.

Photo: The Dead Sea is really this colour
Article: ‘The Race is on to save the Dead Sea’ on The Sunday Times September 3, 2006“…proposal is to carry sea water from the Gulf of Aqaba to replenish the Dead Sea, which has shrunk by a third over the past 50 years and faces total evaporation.
At stake is the area’s delicate ecology and a tourist industry — that draws 100,000 Britons each year — centred on the sea’s mineral-rich waters and mud.A sequence of canals and pipelines would channel sea water down through the arid Arava valley in southern Israel and Jordan to the salt lake at the lowest point on earth, 415 metres below sea level. Action is urgently needed. Over the past 50 years the Dead Sea’s depth has fallen by 20 metres. The so-called “Red to Dead” plan is to reverse this fall, which has been so dramatic that it has left the Israeli spa resort of Ein Gedi a mile from the water’s edge.Photo:The Courtyard at the hotel

“However, Friends of the Earth warned that mixing water from the Red Sea with the unique chemical soup of the Dead Sea could create a natural catastrophe. “The Dead Sea’s mix of bromide, potash, magnesium and salt is like no other body of water on the planet,” said Bromberg.
“By bringing in the marine water, this composition will be changed.There is concern about algae growth and we could see the sea change from deep blue to red and brown and the different waters could separate.”

Photo: Palms in Ein Bokek

(iNFO: Wikepedia)

Photos: Riihele

TIS FOR NOW. Rii xx

HAVE A SUPER WEEKEND!

© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.

Photos Galore in a Show!

Here are for your perusal me fine photos of the river with many faces. Rii xx [rockyou id=62261039]

Fluff & Stuff ~ Water/Water

CLOUDNFLUFF

One comes across these funny as in odd, strange, unusual, pieces of news every now and then.This is the now and the here.

First of all to The Fluff bit: Voss Water

Looking good & Luxury in a bottle
Voss is as much about its packaging as what’s inside. Its cylindrical bottle, resembling that of a perfume bottle, has become an instantly recognisable trademark. With a classic cylindrical bottle, Voss artesian water from
Norway is the latest must-have for thirsty diners and revellers at the UK‘s top restaurants, bars and hotels.

“A sip of Voss is like drinking fresh air,” the company claims, and consumers across the UK are loving it. And what great times it is for bottled water these days – according to statistics, sales of bottled water on the British Isles increased by nearly 50% between 2000 and 2004. Last year it rose another 5.3% to 2,170 million litres – that is nearly £1,600 million in retail sales. Over half of adults in the UK are drinking bottled water and sales are forecasted to rise at an annual rate of 6-8% to almost 3,000 million litres by 2010. The outlook for Norwegian artesian water is promising.
(Norway The Official Site)

Voss Water has been on the market since April 2000. Here is an amusing article  in English that was published in July 2005 in Aftenposten – a Norwegian newspaper. (I read it online in Norwegian.) This link is The Water Connoisseur online site. Interesting reading there.

Worldwide sales of bottled water are estimated to be between $50 and $100 billion (US) annually and increasing approximately 7 to 10 percent annually. In 2004, total sales were approximately 154 billion litres (41 billion gallons). [Gleick 2004] The United States is the largest market for bottled water, at 26 billion liters in 2004. On average, this is one 8-ounce glass per person per day. Italy has the highest average consumption per person, at two 8-ounce glasses per person per day. (Wikipedia)

The Hollywood stars like to be seen holding on to their bottles of Voss. I have not seen this water anywhere in the real life – so far that is. — Have You?

~~~~~0ooOoo0~~~~~

Then secondly to The Stuff – Water Resources of The World. Here is The World’s Water online site. 22 March – World Day for Water 2007 –iNFO. (UNESCO project) “22 March of each year was declared World Day for Water, to be observed starting in 1993, in conformity with the recommendations of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED).”

The world’s largest underground deposit of sweet water lies under Iquazu Falls which are located in the area where Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay meet. (This according to the Asia Times 22.11.2005.)

The Planet Earth*

  • Surface Area of the Planet (510,066,000 sq km)
  • Land Area on the Planet (148,647,000 sq km) 
  • 29.1%Ocean Area (335,258,000 sq km) 
  • Total Water Area (361,419,000 sq km)
  • 70.9% Type of Water (97% salt), (3% fresh) 

Planet Earth has a total surface area of close to 197 million square miles. Most of this surface is covered by water. Most of this water is salty or in the form of ice and thus is not directly usable by humans. About 97% of the total water on earth is in the oceans or salt lakes. Another 2% of the total amount is locked up in the form of ice.

It is estimated that at any given time only about 1/3 of 1% of the total water on earth can be used by humans for agriculture or human consumption. (pages.prodigy.net/jhonig..)  

More than five million people die from waterborne diseases each year – 10 times the number killed in wars around the globe. Seventy per cent of the water used worldwide is used for agriculture. BBC online on article, Water scarcity: A looming crisis? Here is a Quiz: World Water crisis.Go on, have a go and see how you will do on it.

Intriguing information methinks. Another rather amusing article I read in a newspaper about a scientifically made testing about some of the bottled waters on the market versa the tap water in Helsinki. Guess which one came on top as the best? Tap water in Helsinki, believe it or not!

Certainly tis true that the water on tap here in Finland is both very tasty and very clean – so far, so good, that is.

Tis for now. Riihele xx.

* source: Oceans of The World online

The photo is by Riihele.