So Near, Yet So Far

So Near, Yet so far ... by you.

© All Photos: Riihele. All rights reserved.

“The plant is so near,
yet so far …” thought Lumi, the Westie .

The plant puzzled me as well,
as to how does it stay put in the currents et al?!

No wonder, that Lumi, the Westie, was wondering, too!

Plant in the water by you.

This is the plant that
Lumi, the Westie,  was trying to reach at.

Images & Words: Seasons

© Photo: Riihele. All rights reserved

This week’s theme on the IMAGES & WORDS is SEASONS and as our season right now is SUMMER, hence this photo taken a couple summers ago. Tis the season of no night and endless sunlight … Aaaah.

JANE AUSTEN quote with my photograph suit so well together, methinks.

IMAGES & WORDS: distance


© Photo and image remake: Riihele. All rights reserved

I find that there is nostalgia somehow in this photograph taken in Ireland in the summer of 2006:
the tracks of the aeroplanes, the hills,
and the setting sun
add to the feeling of dreaminess and longing.

Yet, it is not despairing for the connection of the lovers is there.

Bray Cliff Walk – Ireland

© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.

Picture Perfect: WET


Riihele.  All rights reserved

The yellow shines so much brighter
— no matter the rain,
nor gloom or doom!

The oil extracted from lilies has healing and softening properties. Especially, when the lily fragrance oil is mixed with that of Calendula aka Pot Marigold works wonderful for very sensitive skin. One can use this oil for massage, in a bath, after a bath, for babies, dry cuticles, and elbows, as a facial moisturizer, under-eye oil and hot-oil treatment.

Some of the lilies are edible even such as Lilium bulbiferous ’Orange lily’ — its bulbs are edible tasting sweet and mealy; these lilies make very fair eating and can be used as a substitute to potato!! Other lilies have medicinal properties such as Lilium candidum ’Madonna lily’ — its bulb is employed for medicinal purposes, having highly demulcent and also astringent properties.

Lilium henryi ’Henry’s lily’ or as it is also known Tiger lily relieve congestion, and the nausea and vomiting of pregnancy  and also, Lilium japonicum ’Krameri’ is  nourishing and useful in diseases of the chest. Lilium martagon ’Martagon lily’ or as it is also called, ’Turk’s cap lily’ their bulb has diuretic, emmenagogue, emollient and expectorant properties. They are used to relieve heart diseases, pain in the cardiac region and angina pectoris.*

These fine wet yellow lilies are my contribution for the Picture Perfect theme WET.

Keep so grand and safe. Rii :))

* Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily
http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/lilies
http://www.thelilygarden.com/pages_lilies/asiatic_yellow_2.html
http://www.thelilygarden.com/
The Lily Garden is a most marvellous site for all things Lilies.

Heat is on …

cartoon from www.weblogcartoons.com

Cartoon by Dave Walker.

Find more cartoons you can freely re-use on your blog at We Blog Cartoons.

Summer Greetings from Finland

18th Century Lane
© Photo: Riihele. All rights reserved.

What is one to say about June, the time of perfect young summer, the fulfillment of the promise of the earlier months, and with as yet no sign to remind one that its fresh young beauty will ever fade. (Gertrude Jekyll)

Then followed that beautiful season… Summer…. Filled was the air with a dreamy and magical light; and the landscape Lay as if new created in all the freshness of childhood. (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)

Porvoo is an old, tiny town just east of Helsinki on the southern coast. I was there early June when the weather was absolutely fabulous and so very hot indeed.

Picture Perfect: BROKEN


MORNING HAS
BROKEN

LIKE
THE FIRST MORNING…

Blackbird has spoken, like the first bird//Praise for the singing,// praise for the morning//Praise for the springing fresh from the word

The Rising Sun with the Maid

© Photo: Riihele. All rights reserved.

Mine is the sunlight, mine is the morning// Born of the one light// Eden saw play//
Praise with elation//praise every morning//God’s recreation of the new day *

This week I am taking the word BROKEN, using it this way as in the new morning that has begun. This photo was taken in the sticks of a place very, very early morn one summer at about 4am!

Keep so grand and safe. Da Paparazii Rii

* MORNING HAS BROKEN:
The lyrics are by the late Eleanor Farjeon – pronounced farr-jon – in 1931 to the melody, that is a Gaelic tune from the 19th Century.

Boulevard of Plants — ALHAMBRA

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Just want to remind us all that there is summer somewhere…

Tis for now, Rii xx

Photo: Taken by Becki – my daughter. All rights reserved.

Link to Alhambra.

 The plant in the photo is Oleander. Oleander (Nerium oleander), is a evergreen shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. It is native to a broad area from Morocco and Portugal eastward through the Mediterranean region and southern Asia to Yunnan in southern parts of China.

Oleander grows well in warm subtropical regions, where it is extensively used as an ornamental plant in landscapes, parks, and along roadsides. It is drought tolerant and will tolerate occasional light frost down to -10°C. Oleander is one of the most poisonous plants and contains numerous toxic compounds, many of which can be deadly to people, especially young children. (Wikipedia)

PICTURE PERFECT: REPETITION


This beautiful manor, Lövstabruk, in Upper Uppland in Sweden was built from the 1600´s to the 1800´s in the likeness to Versailles in Paris. It lies just over 100 km north of Stockholm and 45 km north of Uppsala. Lövstabruk Manor House was plundered and burned in 1719 but was rebuilt building by building during the following decades. (Unfortunately, all those lovely photos and texts in the links highlighted are only in Swedish, for in English there is a totally different page that comes up!) Did you notice that there is even a variation to my photo on these Pelargoniums on the page?

This manor has the honour of being very much in the fore-front of the industry of melting first class iron that laid the foundation on the wealth of Sweden. Walloonbruk in Uppland is a region of unique, historic, industrial sites. Beautiful environments, excellent cuisine and lodgings at the inns and manors, the site tells about this fabulous place.

Decorative Plants @ Lövstabruk
Walloonbruk

An industrial village where natural resources are processed is called a ”bruk” in Swedish. Within the Uppland region all the necessary raw materials for iron production were available: ore from the Dannemora mines, forests for charcoal, and water for powering blast furnaces and forges. More than thirty ironworks were established in the region. These ”vallonbruk” derive their name from the skilled workers who came to Sweden from Liege region in Walloonia of present day Belgium. The craftsmen were brought here by far-seeing industrial entrepreneurs, among them Louis De Geer, who recognized the value of their professional skills. Walloon forging was the principal iron working method here from the early 17th century until the early 20th century. The vallonbruks bar iron was for many years the finest quality available in the world, and much of the production was exported with the greater part going to England.

The bruks were much more than factories. They were complete miniature societies where many people worked and spent their entire lives. Working conditions were hard, but the management also took responsibility for the workers social welfare. Today most of the vallonbruks are well-preserved, unique tourist attractions and a few still maintain world-leading metal industries.

Lövstabruk Manor House

This the photo that I took of the Main House in Lövstabruk Manor which is located near Uppsala – the Athens of Sweden.

The large photo is my entry on the PICTURE PERFECT theme REPETITION’
– the photo does bear repetition, methinks!

Decorative Plants @ Lövstabruk

Tis for now, Rii xx

© Photos: By Riihele. All rights reserved.